Shannon

My work explores our connections of personal identity and memory. My research investigates how we remember both individually and collectively. Primary research is collected through qualitative interviews with people where I gain insight into their memories, perspectives and origin stories. I engage with secondary sources such as found photographs that present an opportunity for analysis and interpretation. The physical artwork I create begins with a sensation or visceral, emotional response from these investigations which evolves towards a more contextual focus as the artwork is created.

I often begin my work by writing a letter to a specific person. I physically paint the words as the base layer on the canvas. The letters are commemorations of their truths and my gratitude towards them. The individuals range from people I know and love to strangers and others who have passed on. The paintings develop from a personal or inspired memory into an expressive abstraction. The artwork I create aspires to communicate the convictions and validity of individual and collective memories, offering a platform for memories to be presented with an echo of history alongside a new and ever-changing narrative. In this space, the development of co-creation storytelling between the artist and the viewer is ignited. Together we cultivate contemporary folklore and at times collective memory. This methodology permits both the artist and the audience to imagine their own interpretation of the work unbridled from alternate truths and realities.

By examining the unique relationships we have with our own memories, I aim to increase the capacity between the story presented and the narrative created. My work serves as a platform for manifesting emotions of deep personal significance from the viewer. This serves to explore the dualism between presentation and individual subjective interpretation. The regeneration/rejuvenation of memories is important as an act of arbitration of how we remember. I create experiences where otherwise forgotten memories are altered and become a resonance of their origin through both abstraction and representation. The paintings created through this method become archetypal representations which tell stories through colours, marks and gestures.